Abbasi Hotel

Abbasi hotel, a 300-year-old building in the midst of the Isfahan city with its historical architecture, was built in Safavid-era under the orders of Shah Sultan Hossein.

Abbasi hotel has 225 rooms and suites including Chechm Andaz and Pardis rooms, standard Qajar and Safavid rooms. All of the rooms are equipped with special safety systems and are constructed based on international hotel standards.

It is a 17th century caravanserai that has been renovated. The simplicity and strength of this hotel are reminiscent of the glory and grandeur of Naqshe-e Jahan square.

The main structure of some of these rooms belongs to the Safavid-era and its architecture is inspired by that era too.

The mixture of plasterwork, illumination and vaulted walls create a unique overall atmosphere.

Magnificent restaurants, traditional dining rooms and a traditional teahouse, each with their outstanding and persistent designs, create the atmosphere which takes you back to the memorable past.

This hotel offers a sport center with pool, sauna, gym, Jacuzzi and massage service for a more enjoyable stay.

Hotel ground represents the classical Persian garden which has a reputation all over the world. The scenic view of the Chahar Bagh School’s dome as well as beautiful trees and garden create a peaceful and delightful environment.

Wall paintings and glittering gilded ceiling work are examples of magnificent art designed by various artists.

Overview

  • TripAdvisor
Opening Hours

Daily Hours: 8 AM – 9 PM

Location

Amadegah St, Isfahan, Iran

Contact

(+98) 31 3222 6010

Price

Free

Mardavij Pigeon Tower

Situated among houses of Isfahan, in the middle of a square named Borj, there is a unique pigeon tower.

The architecture of the pigeon tower represents the work of experienced architects of ancient Iran.

The pigeon tower is regarded as one of the largest ones with a most perfect pattern of this type.

The towers were built for the purpose of attracting pigeons to them so that they would nest in the towers

Pigeons could fly comfortably inside the towers. Their droppings, which contain considerable amounts of elements like nitrogen, were collected in the tower and then used for farmlands that used to be located around the pigeon towers. Nitrogen in pigeon droppings has an efficient role in growth of plants and vegetables.

Pigeon towers were constructed in an impenetrable way that could shelter the pigeons from predators.

The small size of the entrances holes, 7 centimeters by 7 centimeters, on the top of the tower were to prevent large birds such as hawks, owls or crows from entering inside.

A white and slippery circular band made of plaster gypsum about 80 to 100 centimeters wide covers around the base of tower over mud and straw to prevent the creeping up of a snake on the shaft of the tower to enter through the pigeonholes on the top of the tower.

Do not miss the opportunity of visiting this unique pigeon tower.

Overview



  • TripAdvisor

Opening Hours

Outdoor 7/24

Indoor 8 Am-12 pm

Location

Mardavij Pigeon Tower, Azadi Ave, Hezar Jerib Ave, Isfahan, Iran

Contact

(+98) –

Price

It’s free but you can pay tip if you want.

Monar Jonban

The historic monument belonging to the Mongol time, known as Monar Jonban, is a shrine over the tombstone of Amu (Uncle) Abdollah.

Monar Jonban is considered as one of the most popular monuments of Isfahan for its wonderful architecture. It is located in far west of Isfahan.

the twin symmetric minarets are more than a masterpiece. The High architectural knowledge of its architects is reflected in the mysterious structure of the minarets.

The main distinguished feature of this monument is that by shaking strongly one minaret, the other minaret starts shaking with the same frequency. it also can be felt in the whole structure slightly.

According to the latest research that has been done, the reason that the other minaret vibrates automatically after the other one is shaken is the “U-shape” structure of the building. There are also other points of view to this matter but the mystery is still unsolved.

Presently, no one except for the special guard is allowed to climb up the narrow spiral staircase in the minaret to open arched summit and shake the minaret.

A bowl of water can be put over the tomb so that with the waves forming on the surface of the water you can actually see the vibration.

The whole iwan is decorated with Inlaid mosaics with wavy lines and polygonal azure tiles. Dark blue tiles cover the inner side of its arch.

Over the years, this remarkable monument has aroused admiration in the heart of travelers.

Overview

  • TripAdvisor
Opening Hours

From 21 March To 22 September: 9 AM – 6 PM

From 23 September To 20 March: 8 AM – 5 PM

Location

Atashgah Blvd, Isfahan, Iran

Contact

(+98) 3137716066

Price

200,000 Rls

 

Vank Cathedral

The Holy Savior Cathedral (Armenian: Սուրբ Ամենափրկիչ Վանք – Surb Amenaprkich Vank; Persian: کلیسای آمناپرکیچ‎‎ – Kelisā ye Āmenāperkič), also known the Church of the Saintly Sisters, is a cathedral located in the New Julfa district of Isfahan, Iran. It is commonly referred to as the Vãnk (Վանք; وانک), which means “”monastery”” or “”convent”” in the Armenian language.
History
The cathedral was established in 1606, dedicated to the hundreds of thousands of Armenian deportees that were resettled by Shah Abbas I during the Ottoman War of 1603-1618.
The varying fortunes and independence of this suburb across the Zayande River and its eclectic mix of European missionaries, mercenaries and travellers can be traced almost chronologically in the cathedral’s combination of building styles and contrasts in its external and internal architectural treatment.
Construction
The construction is believed to have begun in 1606 by the first arrivals and completed with major alterations to design between 1655 and 1664 under the supervision of Archbishop David. The cathedral consists of a domed sanctuary, much like an Iranian mosque, but with the significant addition of a semi-octagonal apse and raised chancel usually seen in western churches. The cathedral’s exteriors are in relatively modern brickwork and are exceptionally plain compared to its elaborately decorated interior.

(Source: wikipedia.org)

Overview

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Opening Hours

Daily Hours: 8:30 AM –  6:30 PM

Location

Vank Church alley, Jolfa District, Isfahan, Iran

Contact

(+98) 3136243471

Price

300,000 Rls

Ālī Qāpū Palace

Kãkh-e Ãli Qãpou کاخ عالی قاپو

Ali Qapu is a grand palace in Isfahan, Iran. It is located on the western side of the Naqsh e Jahan Square, opposite to Sheikh Lotfollah Mosque, and had been originally designed as a vast portal. It is forty-eight meters high and there are six floors, each accessible by a difficult spiral staircase. In the sixth floor, Music Hall, deep circular niches are found in the walls, having not only aesthetic value, but also acoustic.
The name Ali Qapu, from Persian ‘Ālī (meaning “”imperial”” or “”great””), and Azerbaijani Qāpū (meaning “”gate””), was given to this place as it was right at the entrance to the Safavid palaces which stretched from the Naqsh e Jahan Square to the Chahar Baq Boulevard. The building, another wonderful Safavid edifice, was built by decree of Shah Abbas I in the early seventeenth century. It was here that the great monarch used to entertain noble visitors, and foreign ambassadors. Shah Abbas, here for the first time, celebrated the Nowruz (Iranian New Year) of 1006 AH / 1597 C.E.
Ali Qapu is rich in naturalistic wall paintings by Reza Abbasi, the court painter of Shah Abbas I, and his pupils. There are floral, animal, and bird motifs in his works. The highly ornamented doors and windows of the palace have almost all been pillaged at times of social anarchy. Only one window on the third floor has escaped the ravages of time. Ali Qapu was repaired and restored substantially during the reign of Shah Sultan Hussein, the last Safavid ruler, but fell into a dreadful state of dilapidation again during the short reign of invading Afghans. Under the reign of Nasir ol Din Shah e Qajar (1848–96), the Safavid cornices and floral tiles above the portal were replaced by tiles bearing inscriptions.
Shah Abbas II was enthusiastic about the embellishment and perfection of Ali Qapu. His chief contribution was given to the magnificent hall, the constructures on the third floor. The 18 columns of the hall are covered with mirrors and its ceiling is decorated with great paintings.
The chancellery was stationed on the first floor. On the sixth, the royal reception and banquets were held. The largest rooms are found on this floor. The stucco decoration of the banquet hall abounds in motif of various vessels and cups. The sixth floor was popularly called the Music Hall. Here various ensembles performed music and sang songs.
From the upper galleries, the Safavid ruler watched Chowgan (polo), maneuvers and the horse-racing opposite the square of Naqsh e Jahan.
The palace is depicted on the reverse of the Iranian 20,000 rials banknote. Actually, the palace is depicted on the reverse of the Iranian 20 rials banknote series 1953.

(Source: wikipedia.org)

Overview

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Opening Hours

Daily Hours: 9 AM – 6 PM

Location

Naghsh-e Jahan Sq. Sepah St. Imam Hossein Sq. Isfahan, Iran

Contact

(+98) 3132222173

Price

200,000 Rls

Atiq Square

Atiq Square or Atigh Square or Kohneh Square or Old Square, in Persian:(میدان عتيق or میدان کهنه) was a focal point of the city of Isfahan for centuries. In the eleventh century when Isfahan was the capital of the Seljuk dynasty, it was the main square and the chief centre of the business and social life of the city. It was an important central focus of the city until Naqsh-e Jahan Square was laid out in the 17th centenary. But even at that time, the Kohneh Square preserved its importance as the centre of the city’s minor activities. With the Jameh Mosque on the north, Qeysarieh Bazaar on the west, Harun Velayat Mausoleum and the Ali Mosque on the south, and the Seljuk palaces on the east, the Kohneh Square served as a prototype for majestic Naqsh-e Jahan Square that Shah Abbas I created in its vicinity.
(Source: wikipedia.org)

Overview

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Opening Hours

Daily Hours: 12 AM – 11:59 PM

Location

Imam Ali Square, Isfahan, Isfahan Province

Price

Free

Chehel Sotun Palace

Kakh-e Chehel Sotun

Built as a pleasure pavilion and reception hall, using the Achaemenid-inspired talar (columnar porch) style, this beautifully proportioned palace is entered via an elegant terrace that perfectly bridges the transition between the Persian love of gardens and interior splendour. The 20 slender, ribbed wooden pillars of the palace rise to a superb wooden ceiling with crossbeams and exquisite inlay work. Chehel Sotun means ‘40 pillars’ – the number reflected in the long pool in front of the palace.
The only surviving palace on the royal precinct that stretched between Naqsh-e Jahan (Imam) Sq and Chahar Bagh Abbasi St, this Safavid-era complex is reputed to date from 1614; an inscription uncovered in 1949, however, says it was completed in 1647 under the watch of Shah Abbas II. Either way, the palace on this site today was rebuilt after a fire in 1706.
The Great Hall (Throne Hall) is a gem, richly decorated with frescoes, miniatures and ceramics. The upper walls are dominated by historical frescoes on a grand scale, sumptuously portraying court life and some of the great battles of the Safavid era – the two middle frescoes (Nos 114 and 115) date from the Qajar period but the other four are original. From right to left, above the entrance door, the armies of Shah Ismail do battle with the Uzbeks; Nader Shah battles Sultan Mohammed (astride a white elephant) on an Indian battleground; and Shah Abbas II welcomes King Nader Khan of Turkestan with musicians and dancing girls.
On the wall opposite the door, also from right to left, Shah Abbas I presides over an ostentatious banquet; Shah Ismail battles the janissaries (infantrymen) of Sultan Selim; and Shah Tahmasp receives Humayun, the Indian prince who fled to Persia in 1543. These extraordinary works survived the 18th-century invasion by the Afghans, who whitewashed the paintings to show their disapproval of such extravagance. Other items, including Safavid forebear Safi od-Din’s hat, are kept in a small museum.
The palace’s garden, Bagh-e Chehel Sotun, is an excellent example of the classic Persian garden form and was recently added to UNESCO’s World Heritage list (Read More…). An ancient fallen pine resting on a plinth gives a sense of the great age of the garden. The polished noses of the lions on the standing water spouts at the head of the decorative pool hint at this being a favourite spot for a photograph of the garden’s perfect symmetry. Art students have set up a calico shop at the garden’s entrance selling Iran’s popular printed fabric.

(Source: lonelyplanet.com)

Overview

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Opening Hours

Daily Hours: 9 AM – 6 PM

Location

Sepah St., Imam Hossein Sq., Isfahan, Iran

Contact

(+98) 3132220181

Price

200,000 Rls

Sheikh Lotfollah Mosque

Punctuating the middle of the arcades that hem Esfahan’s largest square, this study in harmonious understatement complements the overwhelming richness of the larger mosque, Masjed-e Shah, at the head of the square. Built between 1602 and 1619 during the reign of Shah Abbas I, it was dedicated to the ruler’s father-in-law, Sheikh Lotfollah, a revered Lebanese scholar of Islam who was invited to Esfahan to oversee the king’s mosque (now the Masjed-e Shah) and theological school.
The dome makes extensive use of delicate cream-coloured tiles that change colour throughout the day from cream to pink (sunset is usually the best time to witness this). The signature blue-and-turquoise tiles of Esfahan are evident only around the dome’s summit.
The pale tones of the cupola stand in contrast to those around the portal, which displays some of the best surviving Safavid-era mosaics. The exterior panels contain wonderful arabesques and other intricate floral designs that have become a signature motif of Esfahan; especially fine are those displaying a vase framed by the tails of two peacocks. The portal itself contains some particularly fine muqarnas (stalactite-type stone carving used to decorate doorways and window recesses) with rich concentrations of blue and yellow motifs.
The mosque is unusual because it has neither a minaret nor a courtyard, and because steps lead up to the entrance. This was probably because the mosque was never intended for public use, but rather served as the worship place for the women of the shah’s harem. The sanctuary or prayer hall is reached via a twisting hallway where the eyes become accustomed to the darkness as subtle shifts of light play across deep blue tilework. This hallway is integral to both the design and function of the mosque because it takes the worshipper from the grand square outside into a prayer hall facing Mecca, on a completely different axis.
Inside the sanctuary, the complexity of the mosaics that adorn the walls and the extraordinarily beautiful ceiling, with its shrinking, yellow motifs, is a masterpiece of design. The shafts of sunlight that filter in through the few high, latticed windows produce a constantly changing interplay of light and shadow that enrich the space and give a tangible quality to empty air. The mihrab is one of the finest in Iran and has an unusually high niche; a calligraphic montage names the architect and the date 1028 AH.

(Source: lonelyplanet.com)

Overview

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Opening Hours

Daily Hours: 9 AM – 12:30 AM, 2 PM – 6 PM

Location

Naghsh-e Jahan Sq. Sepah St., Imam Hossein Sq., Isfahan, Iran

Contact

(+98) 3132225486

Price

200,000 Rls

Isfahan Music Museum

This beautiful new museum in the Armenian Quarter in Jolfa houses a fine collection of traditional Persian instruments. A labour of love for the private collector who assembled these national and folk instruments, the museum regularly hosts live performances by renowned folk musicians. For those with an interest in music, or simply with a love of finely crafted objects, it is well worth the relatively steep admission fee.

(Source: lonelyplanet.com)

Overview


Opening Hours

Daily Hours: 9 AM – 9 PM

Location

No.74, Mehrdad St.(Shahid Ghandi),Tohid St. Isfahan, Iran

Contact

(+98) 3136256912

(+98) 9131146899

isfahanmusicmuseum.com

Price

300,000 Rls

Chahar Bagh School

The Chahar Bagh School is the last magnificent monument built in Safavid era (1704 to 1714) during the reign of King Sultan Hussein. The school was part of a huge complex including Caravanserai (Now it is Abbasi Hotel) and Bazaar (Now it is Bazaar-e Honar, one of the most important gold market in Isfahan).
The name of Chahar Bagh School is Due to its location in Chahar Bagh Street, however, other names such as Soltani School and Madar Shah (Shah’s Mother) School have also been mentioned.
The architecture is in accordance with the climate of Isfahan and is designed based on four seasons (four iwans); in warm seasons, the southern iwan and in the cold seasons the northern iwan were used.
The building of Chahar Bagh School has two floors; Religious courses were taught in first floor and mathematics, astronomy and medicine courses were taught in second floor.
The school includes a large central courtyard in the center and four small yards around the center. The central courtyard with a large pool in the center and lots of trees, makes the interior of the school stylish. The middle pond of the courtyard is supplied with Madi Farshadi (Farshadi Stream).
Visitors have the opportunity of visiting the most beautiful tile collections in Isfahan.
In addition, given the mandatory use of Chador for women while visiting the school, it is an opportunity for them to experience Chador as a kind of Hijab, and touch this Iranian religious culture.

Overview

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Opening Hours

Daily Hours: –

Location

Chahar Bagh Theological School. Chahar Bagh e Abbasi St. Isfahan, Iran

Contact

Price

– Rls

Naqsh-e Jahan Square

(Nᴂghsh-e Jᴂhãn; نقش جهان)

What happened that in 1598, Shah Abbas I decided to change the capital of the Persian Empire from Qazvin to the more central city Isfahan, is a long and interesting story in itself. But had it not been for this shift UNESCO would now have been one amazing item short of its world heritage sites (Read More…). In the making of the new city, Naghsh-e Jahan Square (meaning “Pattern of the world” had undoubtedly the most important role as it became the new religious, political and economic centre of not only the city of Isfahan, but the entire country.

The best artists and craftsmen of the country were invited to Isfahan and the project of the refurbishment of the city began. The royal palace of Ali Qapu, with its magnificent internal and external architecture provided a spectacular panoramic view of the square for the king, the royal family and their VIP guests. They could watch polo games and occasional celebrations from the balcony of the palace.

Moving clockwise form the palace, on the northern side of the square, is Qeysarieh portal which is the entrance to one of world’s biggest roofed markets. The bazaar of Isfahan is a wonderland of tastes and colours, a comprehensive living history of Persian architecture and a busy maze of pathways, shops, religious schools, restaurants, etc.

Next on the square, on the eastern side right across Ali Qapu, is Sheikh Lotfollah Mosque, the private mosque used mainly by the royal family with the religious school underneath in the basement. With its unique dome, Sheikh Lotfollah is another masterpiece on the “pattern of the world”.

On the southern side of the square is the grand Jame Abbasi Mosque, known also as Shah Mosque or Imam Mosque. This was the main congregational mosque of the safavid Isfahan where all important religious gatherings were held including the Friday prayers.  Massive in size, intricate in decoration and unique in its plan, Jame Abbasi Mosque was another symbolic element representing one of the three pillars of the Safavid government: the religious, the administrative and the economic.

In short, Naghsh-e Jahan Square can be seen as the microcosm of the Safavid Persian Empire integrating business, religion and government in such a subtle and smooth manner that the interwoven network of connections between them never interfered with their functional independency.

Overview


Location

Naghsh-e Jahan Sq., Isfahan, Iran

Price

Free

 

Si-o-Seh Pol Bridge

This is probably the most famous of Isfahan’s bridges. It is made up of a series of 33 arches and was commissioned in 1602 by Shah Abbas I from one of his Generals. The name – Si-o-Seh Pol is derived from the Farsi for 33 (Si-o-Seh). The bridge is built on a series of pontoons of great width.
The bridge was originally known as the Bridge of Allahverdi Khan who was the general responsible for its construction. The lower level of 33 arches is surmounted by a second layer, with one arch above each of the pontoons and two arches above the lower single arch, giving it its name and rhythmic appearance. The road along the top is sandwiched between high walls which give some shelter from the wind as well as protection for travelers who can walk along the footpaths on either side to avoid the crush of the traffic. Originally there were frescoes on the walls.
The bridge itself is 295m long and 13.75m wide. The thirty four piers on which it is constructed are 3.49m thick and the arches are 5.57m wide. The southern side of the bridge, where the waters of the Zayandeh run more swiftly has supplementary arches, and it is this that makes them suitable as a tea house. The bridge acted as a springboard for the development of the Khajou Bridge some 50 years later.

(Source: isfahan.org.uk)

Overview


Location

Enghelab Sq. Chahar Bagh e Abbasi St. Isfahan, Iran

Price

Free